Subscriber Services
Weather

Saturday, January 26, 2008

''72 Dolphins talk about Pats pursuit of perfection

The Patriots are trying to match the '72 Dolphins feat of playing a perfect season and so everyone wants to know what the players and coaches on that perfect team think of New England's attempt.

Well, on Friday DICK ANDERSON, BOB GRIESE, JIM KIICK, LARRY CSONKA, MERCURY MORRIS and coach DON SHULA talked at length about the subject on a conference call.

This is the transcript from that call with national media:

Q. I was hoping to ask this of anyone who is on the conference call, given the parity in the NFL with the salary cap and how maybe the team is a little more equal than when you guys played, just talk about what the Patriots have done up to now and how impressed you guys are.
JIM KIICK: I don't believe ‑‑ I think there was more parity in our era because all of the teams were decent. Every team had a great quarterback. I think today after the first seven quarterbacks, there's a big drop off. So I think there was more parity with the teams back then. Right now, it's New England and it's possibly Indianapolis, and everybody else is mediocrity.

Q. Does that speak to the parity or does that speak to how good Indianapolis and New England are?
JIM KIICK: No, I think it's a combination of both. I think they are excellent football teams, yes, but I think the caliber of the other ones, like I said, not only are they mediocre; some are even very poor, like, unfortunately, the Dolphins.

Q. Do you think in the salary cap era that that adds something to what they have accomplished?
DICK ANDERSON: I definitely think it does. It just shows you how important the general manager is and the personnel director, as well as the coaches. The thing I am impressed with with New England is that their coaches are just like Bill Arnsbarger was. Our goal was not to ever make a mental error, and this is the only team in the NFL today, I think, that just doesn't make errors. They are so very, very well coached.

Q. Dick, from a passing game standpoint, Brady and that receiving corps, how would you rate that passing game compared to the passing games that you faced as a secondary guy?
DICK ANDERSON: You can't rate it because the rules are different. We could hit a receiver any place on the field as long as the ball was not in the air and they were between the quarterback and the defensive back.
LARRY CSONKA: I saw you hit them clear behind the bench, what are you talking about?
DICK ANDERSON: We made our living taking down receivers and disrupting their routes and today the receivers have a great ability, after five yards. They are free.
So it's a totally different game today than it was when we played defense.

Q. Was going undefeated a week‑to‑week talk among you guys and among the media back then or did you just kind of, okay, let's win the next one?
BOB GRIESE: There was never any talk about going undefeated. The only problem ‑‑ the only thing that we ever talked about was winning the next ballgame, and I think that's what we've heard all year from the Patriots.
And I think that's a credit to Belichick that he's got these guys thinking about the right thing at the right time. And I think that's where Coach Shula was so good mentally. Each week, there was always something that would come up each week; we've never beaten this team on the road, we had never done this, we had never done that, no team had ever gone undefeated.
Injuries, after one injury, it was like, okay, so what, Griese gets hurt, the next man in, and Earl (Morrall) steps in and does a good job.
So I think Belichick has done a real good job and I think that's one of the keys to Coach Shula back in '72 that nothing really fazed him. He just accepted it, never talked about going undefeated. Only talked about trying to get back and winning the Super Bowl.

Q. If I could ask one of you, where do you think this places the Patriots in history if they do finish this out and go 19‑0? Obviously they have passed your team's record for an undefeated streak, but where do you think this places them historically?
DICK ANDERSON: If Mercury were here, he would say that we're compared initially to the 1934 and 1942 Bears because they were the first team to go undefeated during the regular season, but then they lost in the playoff games.
From our standpoint, we went undefeated all the games that were thrown against us, we played the Championship Game in Pittsburgh, and we were just fortunate to be the only team in the history of the NFL in 88 years to go undefeated. If New England does it, they will be the second team to go undefeated and I think they have a real good chance to do so.

Q. Usually when you have a season like you guys did, and certainly a great season, it always comes from adversity, and I want to talk you back to that Super Bowl against Dallas, January 15, 1972. How much of what you did came from that game, and I guess to Bob, as well, how sick are you of seeing that highlight of you being chased around the field in New Orleans by Bob Lilly on that play?
BOB GRIESE: I think that we'll all tell you that that was the seed that was planted by Coach Shula right after we lost to Dallas in that Super Bowl was that was the seed that was planted for our season the following year, and he never let us forget that we lost an opportunity to win the championship and we'd have to come back the next year and then all of these games just to get back and have an opportunity to do what we were trying to do three or four hours before.
So Coach Shula was always telling us and motivating us in that way. I couldn't hear your second question; you were breaking up.

Q. The second part of the question was, how tired are you of looking at that highlight of Bob Lilly chasing you all over that field in New Orleans for the 26‑yard loss?
BOB GRIESE: It wasn't just Bob Lilly. I saw Bob Lilly over the weekend, as a matter of fact. I was talking to him about that and he said, yeah, there were a couple other guys. When I would try to go to the right, the defensive end was there, and when I reversed the other way and tried to go back to the left, there was another defensive end there. So there were three guys there, not one. You sound like Coach Shula, razzing me about this.

Q. Rightly or wrongly, you guys have been portrayed as a bunch of players 35 years in the making desperately trying to hold on to this undefeated record. If the Patriots do go 19‑0, would you be upset, maybe don't care if they join you as the only undefeated team in really the modern era?
MERCURY MORRIS: You mentioned the word desperately trying to hold onto. Let me set you straight. First of all, there's nothing for us to hold on to because there's nothing for us that belongs to us. It only belongs to the history of the National Football League. It's been 35 years. This record is old enough to be president and nobody has done anything except almost make it.
These guys are the first guys who have actually come close for real, and I take my hat off to them. So there's no way that we could have stopped it. It could have happened in '73, 74, '75, 76. It's been 1,290 tries.

Q. I'm curious, the Patriots are the favorite; do you guys remember, were you even favorites against the Redskins?
LARRY CSONKA: As I recall, we were underdogs in the Super Bowl. We were underdogs pretty much the whole season. That's why we beat the spread so much. I think that comes back to what Griese was talking about.
MERCURY MORRIS: The Washington Redskins, the three teams they lost to that year were the Dallas Cowboys, the Buffalo Bills and the New England Patriots. We ironically beat the New England Patriots.

Q. Did you guys think at the time you were getting the respect you were deserved? The Patriots seem to be getting respect right and left as the greatest this, and greatest that.
MERCURY MORRIS: It had not been done before, so there was no criteria for you to make a judgment as to whether or not a team is going to try to go undefeated. This was new territory. In fact, the term perfect season only showed up on the scoreboard out in Los Angeles when after we won the games, it said, "The Dolphins are perfect, 17‑0."

Q. I've been looking into and comparing Super Bowl weeks from what you guys went through to what it's like today, and there was a couple of themes from back then and if anybody wants to jump in on this is more than welcome to. One of them back then, there was a lot of talk about spying on the part of George Allen and how you guys changed practice fields to prevent that. Another theme was Shula trying to win the big one after losing a couple of times, and I also came across a couple references early in the week to when you guys had no curfew, you took full advantage of that. Anyone want to jump in on any of those?
DICK ANDERSON: I'll answer the last question first. I was with (Larry) Csonka and Jim Kiick and (Jake) Scott and Jim Mandich the night that we did not have any curfew. I was the designated driver. We just had fun in L.A. and got back in the wee hours of the morning.

Q. I've got a totally different perspective, so many people I know are really in support, they feel that there was something magical about the '72 Dolphins team and they don't want to see anybody else do it. There's another perspective here, there's not just the Dolphins, players and Dolphins fans; there's a lot of people outside of Miami who would like to see somebody do it. Would any of you like to pick up on that? Did other people realize there was something special about the legacy besides some of the players?
DICK ANDERSON: I think there's certainly Dolphin fans that would like to see that record sustained. But you know, records are made to be broken and eventually it is going to happen and it has not happened yet, and they have a very good chance to do so. But we can't do anything about it. All we can do is if they are undefeated through the season, congratulate them and say they are the second team to do it.

Q. Some people have made a lot of the Patriots stealing signals, and somebody thinks even an asterisk should go next to this. How do you guys look at that and do you think it besmirches their season at all?
MERCURY MORRIS: I don't think it really does anything to them. It was one game, an event and I don't think their season should be defined out of that mishap. Obviously if you got caught cheating, you got caught cheating.
I think the intent was there to steal signals rather than to put themselves in a position where they would have an advantage as far as games are concerned as they soon realized they are so good they didn't have to have that small advantage they tried to do get and eventually cost them a first round draft pick and it eventually did that.

Q. Does it take on even added significance when most of your record was achieved with Earl Morrall as your quarterback?
DICK ANDERSON: What it says is that we had a great team and each week somebody else stepped up and got the job done. And it so happened that the rest of the team picked their belts up a little bit and played a little bit harder. When Bob got healthy and we were struggling against Pittsburgh, he came in and ignited us. So it's still a team effort, it was a team effort the whole year, and that's how we looked at it.

Q. Is there any resentment when among you guys, the '72 Dolphins were portrayed as grumpy old men that no other teams could be as great as them; that you have a bottle of champagne waiting when teams lose; is all of that stuff overblown and are you a little tired of hearing that stuff?
JIM KIICK: No. 1, I prefer Jack Daniels, I don't like champagne, so we don't sit around waiting with a bottle of champagne waiting for that last team to lose the game, and most importantly, what we are celebrating is our accomplishments, not the loss of the team.
We are proud and obviously football is the ultimate team sport and as Dick alluded to, we were more concerned about winning football games than individual statistics.
So that's what we are celebrating, our accomplishment that has not been done in 35 years and really has not been done prior to that. So we certainly are not celebrating the loss of any team but our accomplishments.

Q. Looking ahead to next Sunday's game, the Giants and Patriots met four weeks ago, how difficult is it going to be for the Patriots to beat the Giants a second time?
MERCURY MORRIS: If I'm not mistaken, didn't we play them (Redskins) in the preseason?
DICK ANDERSON: Preseason game, 27‑24 loss. (Sonny) Jorgensen was the quarterback.
MERCURY MORRIS I think it's different in that respect, because when you lose to a team, that gives you a momentum or impetus to play a little better or play with more tenacity because you know that what's at stake is something that's already happened once, and you don't want that to happen again.
We actually lost in 1973 to the Oakland Raiders which knocked our streak off at 18 games in a row, but then we came back and beat them in the AFC Championship Game.
So I think that part of that is the fact that any given Sunday, any team can beat any other team. So you just never know.

Q. The Redskins, you had lost in the preseason to them; what was the main concern going into that Super Bowl game against the Redskins, and were you bummed out that it wasn't the Cowboys who had beaten you in that Super Bowl the year before?
DICK ANDERSON: I don't think we thought about the Cowboys because they weren't there and again, one game at a time. As a defensive player, the best thing the Redskins did was try to block Manny Fernandez one‑on‑one and he made 17 tackles. George Allen made a mistake and I think it cost him. Larry Brown had been hit so many times in that first half, that you know, he didn't come out with the same tenacity in the second half.
You know, our offense, I can't speak about, but again it was the team ‑‑ we were an underdog and we had got beat the year before and we just were not going to be beat again.

Q. Bob, you had an injury; did you ever have photographers chasing you down to see if you had a boot on your foot or anything like that?
BOB GRIESE: That's one of the ways things have changed in the 35 years, the paparazzi are chasing down athletes all over the place.
I don't know who the hot chicks were back then, the move‑stars and the move‑actresses were back then we were supposed to be running around with. I had a boot on my leg but no paparazzi came around for me.

Q. You guys have seen a lot of teams come close and fall short of this perfect season so to speak. In this modern era where parity ceases to be kind of the normal with free agency and all that, did you think that a team eventually would do it?
BOB GRIESE: Free agency can run both ways. I think it can run away and spread throughout the teams and make them all equal, but then again, like New England this year, you can go out and get guys like a Stallworth, a Moss, a Wes Welker, or an Adalius Thomas, they were a good team without these guys.
Then you can go out and it's almost like an all‑star team if the management, like Dick was saying a little bit earlier, if your general manager and player personnel guy can go out and pick up some free agents, and the right ones and get them for a fourth round pick, get them for a second round pick, and pick up a free agent, you know, it's not ‑‑ I would say it's not surprising but you can certainly see why New England has gone undefeated with all of their additions offensively and their defense from the years past.

Q. What are your specific plans for Super Bowl Sunday? I'm sure you'll all watch the game, but will you be in parts of the country where you won't be able to watch it together?
DICK ANDERSON: We've never watched a game together.
MERCURY MORRIS: Never.
BOB GRIESE: We've never watched it together and there's never any champagne. I don't think any champagne or any champagne glasses have ever been clicked by any Dolphins. I think that was something that was mentioned in jest and I think the media ‑‑
DICK ANDERSON: You were home when you started it, Bob.
MERCURY MORRIS: If you look back at my [pictures] You had Dick Anderson, Mercury Morris, Larry Little, Jim Kiick, Nick Buoniconti and Don Shula. Nick is spreading the champagne all over the place and Shula is sitting there with a toast and he looks at a picture and goes, "Hey, I said I don't do that. But unfortunately, it’s there. We just had fun with it."
DICK ANDERSON: That happened a month later. (Laughter).

Q. Many of your teammates, many of you guys outside of football had great careers, and I'm just curious, since there's a correlation between what you guys did on the field and what came after, can some of you talk about what you've done after football, because here we are talking about something that happened decades ago.
MERCURY MORRIS: I think Shula gave everybody a different kind of direction and purpose being coached by this guy. We were middle‑class people and middle‑class fans, and Shula was a blue‑collar worker; and he had kind of a work ethic that really allowed you to see that if you work hard and you do what you're supposed to do, then things are going to turn out for you, and not all the time but you adjust to that and do what's necessary to try to do as best you can.
And I think that a lot of us learned a great deal from Don's work ethic, and learned that we came from adversity ‑‑ because we were a rag‑tag team in 1969. And when he came, the team was transformed and we became a playoff team in '70, a Super Bowl team in '71 and then undefeated and back‑to‑back.
So we had a great run with guys who were assembled there, not for the purpose of being that successful that quick. Keep in mind, the Dolphins came into existence in 1966. By 1972, we had produced an undefeated season. That part was real special and that principally came because of Don Shula.
LARRY CSONKA: I'd like to just interject one thing, because I've got to get off the phone. But when you alluded to in your question about going on to other things, getting away from Shula provided me with a great motivation to go all the way to Alaska in a cool stream in July instead of doing grass grills and having Shula stepping over my stomach, saying, "you don't like me," he had no idea how much I didn't like him. (Laughter).
The only reason I didn't get put in jail for committing murder was I wanted to be able to go away and stand in a stream in Alaska, and that's what I now do. And every July, every July, gentlemen, I think about the fact that I'm not in Miami, I don't have grass and sweat running down my neck and him standing on my stomach. (Laughter).
So if you were looking for motivation, that's the most motivation I've ever had in my life from anyone.

Q. I just want to know off the subject a little bit, if Larry thinks the gladiators he hosted are better than the ones on TV now?
LARRY CSONKA: I don't know, but the commentators were a hell of a lot better when I was there.


Q. Did you ever think you would see the day when a team was one win from doing what your Dolphins did in '72?
DON SHULA: You know, it's hard to say because there were some teams that went 13‑0 one year, and I guess 11‑0, but to see somebody now 18‑0, you've got to feel that this is a great football team that's got a chance to do something no other team has done; that's go 19‑0 and have a perfect season.
So it's interesting and it should be a great Super Bowl.

Q. Do you think it's more difficult these days with the salary cap and free agency to do that?
DON SHULA: You know, you talk about the salary cap and free agency, but you know, when we did it, we had to beat the best that was out there. And the Patriots, if they do it, they have got to beat the best that's out there.
The thing that happened to us, if we would have had free agency, we would have been better off, after the perfect season, Csonka, Kiick and (Paul) Warfield took off and we couldn't sign anybody to come in and take their place. It's a situation where you deal with what you're confronted with, and if you win, you're the best.

Q. Who on your '72 team would you compare to Wes Welker on this year's Patriots?
DON SHULA: You know, Paul Warfield was our deep threat and probably one of the greatest athletes that ever played the game. And we had Howard Twilley, more of a possession type of receiver on the other side, and we had Jim Kiick, Larry Csonka and Mercury Morris for the situation substitutions that we used.
The thing people don't realize is that in '72, Bob Griese got hurt in the fifth game of the season and our backup quarterback took us to the Championship Game. Then Bob Griese came back in the second half and helped us win the Super Bowl.
So we went through that perfect season, the majority of it, with a backup quarterback.

Q. Can you put into words just how incredibly difficult it is to make it through an entire NFL season without losing a game?
DON SHULA: Well, when you think about the 50 years before we did it in '72, and the 35 years since we've done it, that tells you how difficult it is to do because, you know, the league is so highly competitive, and all of the rules in the league are designed for competitive balance.
And it's tougher to stay on top than the struggle to get to the top because the team that finishes last gets the best draft pick, they get the first place on the waivers. Everything is done to keep the team from having a dynasty and staying on top, and that's why it's so remarkable when a team does stay on top for a period of time.
New England, winning three out of the last six Super Bowls, I think that's remarkable.

Q. Do you think that this is a dynasty, the Patriots?
DON SHULA: Yeah, I think they are on the verge right now. As I mentioned, three out of the last six Super Bowls, and if they win this one, you have to consider them a team that would be a dynasty like the Yankees were in baseball over a long period of time.
You know, we had those two great years, '72 and ‘73, 17‑0 and 15‑2; 32‑2 in a two‑year period; that doesn't qualify as a dynasty, but that's a record we are pretty proud of.

Q. Given the liberal passing rules, more teams pass, you can't bump‑and‑run the receivers down the field and that today's players are bigger and faster, etc., etc., can you really compare the two eras?
DON SHULA: The rules certainly are different now. It's opened up the passing game. And I spent 20 years on the competition committee and our whole emphasis on the competition committee was to open up the game up, more scoring, make more big plays in the game, make the game as safe as you possibly could make it injury‑wise. So all of these things have been designed to make the game more appealing to the fan. You know, the high‑scoring games and more big plays.

Q. When you were in the booth for the Patriots game in Baltimore, were you rooting for the Ravens?
DON SHULA: You know, I spent a lot of years in Baltimore. I spent four years as a player and seven years as a coach in Baltimore. So I would have to say that I was rooting for the Ravens, yes.

Q. Was too much made about your comment of an asterisk and do you stand behind that?
DON SHULA: You know, I'm probably not the guy that should have said it, and I think a lot of people, when I said it, received it as being, you know, just helping yourself.
I think that the fact that ‑‑ as I mentioned, I didn't fine them, I didn't take away the draft choice, I wasn't the one that coined the term "Spygate." All of those things happened and all I did was refer to them.
Now, somebody else probably should have done it instead of me, because people thought it was self‑serving when I did it.

Q. What do you think about the Super Bowl. Is it going to be close?
DON SHULA: The way I feel about it is the Giants have done a great job. They were 0‑2 to start the year and everybody counted them out and everybody wanted to fire the coach. And all of a sudden at the end of the year they get it together, Eli Manning comes on strong and the coach then becomes a genius again.
And so this team is really on the rise and you really ‑‑ I mean, you shouldn't count them out because they keep bouncing back. You know, Dallas beat them twice during the regular season and then they beat Dallas in the playoffs.
Eli Manning just keeps getting better. So I think that this is a team that's capable of giving New England a good game. And what I want to see more than anything else is a good, hard‑fought Super Bowl, and then let the best team win.
You know, if New England doesn't lose, you know, you just give them credit for 19‑0 and something nobody else has ever done.

Q. Did you guys ever talk about going undefeated or a perfect season during the ’72 season?
DON SHULA: No. When we had the 17‑0 record, we got beat the year before in the Super Bowl. Our whole emphasis was not to get to the Super Bowl, but to get to the Super Bowl and win it. And if somewhere along the line we would have lost a game or two games and won the Super Bowl, it would have been a great success. But if we would have gone 16‑0 and then lost the Super Bowl, that season would have been a complete failure as far as we were concerned.
So I think that's where New England is right now. They are 18‑0, and the thing that's really going to make their season is if they can win that last game and do something else nobody has done, 19‑0.

Q. How much pressure was there to win that last game going into Los Angeles when you were 16‑0 standing on the precipice?
DON SHULA: There was a lot of pressure. People just didn't believe us that we were actually 15‑0. I think we were underdogs going into the game. You know, the Redskins were favored and people just didn't ‑‑ I don't think they gave us the credit that our team deserved. You know, we had the no‑name defense and we were very ball‑controlled offense and didn't throw the ball a lot and relied a lot on ball control and time of possession.
In the Super Bowl, you know, the score was 14‑0 when I decided to go for the field goal and when Garo (Yepremian) messed it up, they scored a touchdown and all of a sudden, the Redskins are back in game, a game that we had dominated.

Q. That field goal would have made it 17‑0, 17‑0 season, did you want to ring his neck? He didn't even try to make a tackle.
DON SHULA: I would have loved that ‑‑ could have been 17‑0, that would have been a great way to remember that game. But when Garo went in there and messed up the play, you know, he used to come over and high‑five me when he kicked a field goal. Well, when that happened, he went off the end line of the end zone and I haven't seen him since.

Q. If you were coaching, how would you go about trying to beat the Patriots?
DON SHULA: Well, what you've got to do ‑‑ you mentioned earlier that I was at the game up in Baltimore, the Ravens game, and I thought the Ravens had a great game plan against them where they got the running game going and they made some first downs and had some long drives. That's what you've got to do.
Anything that you can do to keep the ball away from (Tom) Brady for any period of time, you've got to try to do, because Brady is so dynamic, and the guy is just a great football player. He just finds a way to score no matter what the score is. The Patriots always believe that they can pull it out and win at the end.
So anything that you can do when you're setting up a game plan is try to control the ball and keep it out of Brady's hand.

Q. Were you drained at the end of your undefeated season? Were you glad you didn't have another game at the end, or did you feel like you wanted to play more?
DON SHULA: Yeah, you always feel like you want to play more. When you have it going like that, it's just magical and when you do something that nobody else has ever done; it just makes it that much more significant and you just feel that much more proud of your accomplishments. You want to keep playing and you want to keep winning.

Q. A lot of the guys on the ’72 team have gone on to bigger and better things; in that sense, do you think the perfect season helped them along the way with their confidence?
DON SHULA: Yeah, when you look at what our players have done from that perfect season team, they have gone out and made great lives for themselves, great careers. They have been pretty successful in whatever they have set out to do.
The thing I have always said when I talk about that football team is the thing that set them apart was their intelligence and their competitiveness. They have really worked hard. They wanted to win and they were very smart. We made very few mental errors. We never beat ourselves. We were the least penalized team in the league, and we made very few mental errors and we were a team that just never beat ourselves.

Q. I think I heard you say on NFL Films, that the team that beat the Vikings the next year in the Super Bowl was even better than ‑‑
DON SHULA: I don't think I said that because I think it's hard to beat 17‑0 and 15‑2 was the next year and we dominated the Super Bowl.
I probably was referring more to that game (Super Bowl VIII) the way we took off and kept the ball out of (Fran) Tarkenton's hands and controlled the football, probably 40 minutes to 20 minutes in the ballgame which was pretty characteristic of that team with Larry Csonka and his great ability to convert short yardage and goal‑line plays into first downs and touchdowns.

Q. Has there ever been champagne consumed from the last undefeated team the following season? Griese said no; Anderson said yes. Clear that up for us. Has champagne ever been consumed in the name of the last undefeated team falling?
DON SHULA: You know we've been accused of getting together, that bunch of angry old men as you guys portray us as being, that's not really true.
We're a bunch of guys that if ‑‑ and I've said this many, many times, if somebody goes undefeated, I'm going to be the first guy to call that coach and congratulate him, and I'll do that to Bill Belichick if they go undefeated. And our players, I'm sure, will do the same for their players.
But until somebody does it, you know, we're very, very proud of our accomplishment, and that's all there is to it.

Q. Do you feel like the '72 team has gotten the respect overall it deserves? And also, last year, when NFL Films did the America's game countdown, that group ranked your team No. 1. Do you think that finally gave your team the respect it deserved?
DON SHULA: Well, I think that went a long way toward giving our team that respect, because you know, that was I think a countdown that had people voting on it, and there was a lot of thought that was put into that determination that we were the best team of all‑time.
And I think that our players earned that, because how else do you judge? I mean, you can't say a team that's lost two or three ballgames in a year is better than a team that goes 17‑0. And there were some people early that said that about other teams, and you've still got to go by the record. I mean, that's why you keep score, to see who wins the game. At the end of the year, the team with the best record is the team that should be thought of as the best team.

Q. You mentioned going into the Super Bowl being underdogs; how do you think it's different for the Patriots being the favorites with the weight of history kind of looming around them?
DON SHULA: I think the way that Bill Belichick handles things, and how all his players talk the same way; they sound like they are Bill Belichick talking when they say the only thing that's important is the next game. And I think Bill has done a done a great job of selling that to his team.
They don't care about what's happened in the past and they don't care about what's going to happen two or three weeks down the road. They put all of their energy and emphasis on preparing for the next game, and that's prepared beautifully for them and they have all bought into what Bill teaches, and I think that's why they have been so successful.

Q. What similarities do you see between your '72 Dolphins and this season's Patriots?
DON SHULA: I think the similarities are we were a team that just didn't make many mistakes, as I said earlier, and we didn't beat ourselves. When you look at the Patriots, they are a team that just doesn't make a lot of mistakes. I don't think they ever have been accused of beating themselves or not being prepared. They do a great job.
I think they are a much more wide‑open football team with (Tom) Brady as the quarterback than we were with Griese and (Earl) Morrall. We played more of a ball‑control style of offense, and they are wide open. Brady will just let it fly. Against Jacksonville, he was 26 out of 28 with one dropped ball. A lot of them were just short passes, but that's what Jacksonville was giving him and Brady had the intelligence and the patience to sit back there and just take what they were giving him and methodically move down the field and to not make any mistakes.

Q. Were there any games during the regular season, close games, where you felt fortunate to get out of there with a win?
DON SHULA: The game that I remember the most was the game at Minnesota, and we were down, we needed two scores in the last few minutes to win the game. And I went for the field goal first and Garo (Yepremian) came through for us and kicked a field goal.
Then we had to get the ball back and we got the ball back and moved it down the field and I think on the last play we had a play‑action pass to (Jim) Mandich in the end zone. I think that's what pulled us out, Griese to Mandich. That was probably our hardest‑fought game that went down to the wire.

Q. You've coached against some of the great quarterbacks and coached some of the greatest quarterbacks; how good is Brady in terms of history of the game?
DON SHULA: Well, you look at what he's done, you know, they have won three out of the last five Super Bowls, and they are on the verge of winning another Super Bowl. And Brady this year, he's broken all the passing records and he's just been unbelievable as far as what he's been able to do.
You know, when you think about what the Patriots have done, they went out and got (Donte) Stallworth and Randy Moss and got (Wes) Welker, three new receivers for Brady that they didn't have the year before; and that's a real credit to their scouting department and coaching staff for bringing in new receivers and then putting them on the same page with Brady, and then going out and accomplishing what they have accomplished.

Q. You mentioned the fact that earlier, you said that one of the motivations to the season was the Dallas game and the Super Bowl. How much did you put that loss into the next season. How much was it, not browbeating to death, but how much was that a motivation?
DON SHULA: It was a tremendous motivation for us because after we got beat in the Super Bowl by Dallas, we realized and I realized that before that game, the two teams that are preparing for the Super Bowl are both treated the same. They are given an equal amount of time, publicity, player interviews, the coaching interviews, everything that goes on, it's the same for both teams.
When the game is over, they only go to one locker room, and that's the winning locker room where they are hoisting the trophy and everybody is happy and celebrating. And the losing coach gets a token interview outside the dressing room with one camera there and you feel so sorry for them. I told our team after that loss, I said, "We don't ever want to feel that way again. So our objective is not going to be to get to the Super Bowl, it's going to be to get to the Super Bowl and win the Super Bowl, because we want to be in that winning locker room."

Q. I know in '73 you guys were under pressure to win the big game, and there was talk how upbeat you were during the whole week, even though you were sick. How were you able to pull that off, and how was it able to set the tone for the players seeing the coach acting so upbeat when you were under so much pressure?
DON SHULA: You know, I took a lot of heat because I was 0‑2 in the Super Bowl, and when you're 0‑2 in Super Bowls, people don't say kind things about you. The worst thing that can be said about a coach is that he can't win the big one. That was planted in the minds of the media by Carol Rosenbloom after I left, and that was brought up all week long.
You know, that's the thing I hated to hear and you know, I certainly didn't want to be 0‑3 in Super Bowls because then they would really nail the “you can't win the big one label on you.”
So that was a real motivation for me and then to be able to win the big game finally in my coaching career and make that the end of a perfect season just made it all the more rewarding.

Q. What do you miss most about coaching?
DON SHULA: The thing I miss most about coaching is game day. You know, the excitement, the adrenaline, the decision‑making on game day and the emotional highs and lows that you're on and above all, that feeling of satisfaction if and when you win the game.
And especially what I liked more than anything in my coaching career was having a lot of respect for the coach that I was coaching against and the team that we are playing against; and then to end up being the winner in that game, because it made you feel that much better about your accomplishment, because you knew that you were beating a good coach and you knew that you were beating a good team.

Q. How elated will you be if you're sitting in your living room Super Bowl Sunday and the Giants do pull the upset and the Patriots don't draw even with you.
DON SHULA: I'm going to be at the game. I'll be jumping up and down. (Laughter).

Q. How has the game changed coaching‑wise, the philosophy itself.
DON SHULA: Well, the big thing that's happened in the years that I've played and my early years of coaching was that football was a six‑month sport. When it was over with, the players would go to their respective homes and get an off‑season job, and then about a week before training camp, they would start working out to get in shape for the preseason.
And now, you know, when the season is over, you get a couple of weeks off and players are encouraged to stay in town and get into the off‑season programs, you know, lift weights and go to film study and then go out on to the field for drills on the field. So it's become a 11‑, 11‑and‑a‑half month game now, a job, compared to five or six months back in those early days.
I think that's why the game has picked up the way that it has. It's just gotten so much better as far as players' conditioning and the size of the players, and then the sophistication of the game because everybody has worked at it so much harder and so much longer.

Q. How much of what you do is an element of luck, too, in that particular season? How much if you put a percentage on it was luck?
DON SHULA: Well, I don't know how much luck. You know, luck works both ways. The winning team is not always the only team that has luck during the course of a ballgame. I mean, the ball bounces, you know, for the team that might lose the ballgame, too. They might have some lucky plays or lucky bounces during the course of that game.
But when it's all over with, you know, both teams are playing with the same ball, you have the same rules and regulations that over a period of time, it evens out. The best teams win.

Q. I'm trying to get a handle on just how special a group of people ‑‑ when did you start recognizing that you had a dynamic group of people around you to do anything you wanted?
DON SHULA: You know, when I got there, as you know, in 1970, the year before, they were 3‑10‑1 and when I got there, I had all of these plans for practices and the players went on strike and I had nobody to coach.
So when the strike was settled and they came back, then, as you know, I worked them four times a day to try to get the new game plan in and get them ready to go. And at that time, I realized, you know, the intelligence of these players, the dedication of these players. They complained about the long practices and meetings and workouts.
But at the end of the year, when we won, they were asked, you know, how did you turn it around, and invariably they always said: We worked harder in the classroom, we studied harder, we practiced harder and it helped on game day. So that's what helped was the extra work and intelligence and preparation and the hard work and dedication and competitiveness of those players on those two teams, 17‑0, 15‑2.

20 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

I would just like to point something out that has not been addressed. People are talking about how it's harder for the Pats to go undefeated than it was for the Dolphins because of parity in the league. What they are failing to mention is how football was a tougher game in that era. I remember watching defensive lineman literally punching o-linemen in the head and knocking them out trying to get to the QB. There weren't any of these new age rules protecting QBS from the slightest touch or rules governing how to tackle someone without getting penalized. I understand that it is for the protection of the players and that's a good thing but remember when concussions were categorized as "migraines" and they would give players Tylenol and send them back out on the field? My point is that for an offense to succeed the way the Dolphins did at that time, had to be just as hard if not harder to do. For a team to go undefeated in an era where anything goes is quite an accomplishment and should not be diminished by the Pats accomplishments this year. They were (and are) both great teams,,,period. NYScott

5:46 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Also, the Patriots were caught cheating and are only the (second?)team in league history to have a draft pick taken away. Their coach was fined and the team was fined all together close to a million dollars. How is it that this is not brought up EVERY time someone mentions the Patriots? Baseball players are being raked over the coals for steroid use but an entire organization was cheating and no one cares. Bellichick won coach of the year in a year that he was caught cheating?! That's a wonderful message to send to young children and athletes in our country. Why not cheat? Even if you get caught you will still be rewarded. Isn't this the year they were supposed to crack down on this kind of behavior?

6:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The last post was by me. NYScott

6:07 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I gotta say, as a Dolfan, I'm so tired of hearing what the 72 team has to say. Get over yourselves, nobody needs to hear your bullshit every week the patriots win a game.

6:19 PM  
Anonymous Phins Fan in NE said...

I agree....tired of the 72 dolphins....let's win today!

8:16 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Screw the Patriots!!!

11:02 PM  
Anonymous sam I am said...

I believe the Dolphins in their prime would beat the Patriots of today. Yes, the OL were smaller back in the day, but nobdoy could cover Paul Warfield and the Miami defense would confuse Brady.

And Mercury Morris ran a 4.45 in his day. That is still amazing for a RB today.

11:04 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I try to stay objective in these blogs, but you guys who say you are tired of hearing the '72 Dolphins talk are crazy. If you really listen to them, they aren't bragging or talking crap about today's NFL. They're admitting how good the Patriots are and they're also proud of what they accomplished. The reason you hear what they have to say so much is because what they did was amazing, so amazing, in fact, that 35 years later people still talk about them. In all of sports history in the U.S., the '72 Dolphins are considered one of the best teams. That team is the Jordan or Babe Ruth of team sports. Get used to hearing about them and from them, even if the Patriots win. NYJEFF

1:41 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

You people who are sick of the '72 Fins think it's going to stop?

It'll be worse since you'll be hearing pretty boy Brady and whomever else talking about it on their side until the day we all die.

I'd rather hear Shula and his boys talk about it all day long than hear a few minutes of punk Brady and his smug teamates.

6:40 AM  
Anonymous Patrick said...

The 72 Dolphins’ legacy will remain intact even if NE wins the Super Bowl. The argument that it is tougher to create a dynasty team in the free agency era is proving to be false. There was no free agency back in the day and it put the onus on a team’s ability draft, but I believe NE is the first team in the FA era to use both talent acquisition tools with almost flawless efficiency.

The use of FA, the draft, while making a couple of great trades has put NE in the position no team has been in for 35 years. Another point being overlooked is with free agency is the player has a bigger say in what team they will play for. This is true today even when making trades. Player contracts are written to give the player choices if his current team puts him on the trading block. Players can go where they want to play in FA and many times in trades.

I believe this has created a system that blows parity out the window and we are likely to see more teams go undefeated in the near future. Adalius Thomas is a perfect example. Any professional athlete wants to win; competitors do not put so much into a sport to lose week in and week out. Given the option of playing for the Dolphins or the Patriots, Thomas is going to pick the Patriots every time. Moss is going to reject a trade to the Dolphins, while jumping at a chance to play for NE. In both cases, even if it is for less money. There are players who will go to the Dolphins a la Joey Porter, but do you think if the Patriots wanted Porter he would not playing for them today?

So let’s put this SB and the current Dolphin situation in perspective. The lesson NE has taught the NFL is that winning begets winning in the FA era. On the flip side, losing begets losing. Because this system promotes the rich getting richer we will see more teams in the near future who will roll to near or all the way to undefeated seasons. At the same time we will see teams that dwell in the cellar for many years trying to claw out.

For NE it means doing something no team has done in 35 years and none had done before them. For Dolphins it means learning how to use this system as NE has done. Drafting is the key because the best FA and trade opportunities will only come once the Dolphins have begun to scale the mountain. So Mr. Parcells and Mr. Ireland, you have your work cut out for you and I’m hoping you folks can get us moving in the right direction, because while we are poor boys, the rich are getting richer.

And folks, with this in mind don’t worry about the legacy of the 72 fins. They won when teams were not built by front running players wanting to get an easy ride into the super bowl. (I couldn’t end with out a little barb at NE!)

10:31 AM  
Anonymous NY-CLINTON-DOLPHINS said...

Mando, you naughty boy, did you do this?

"Quarterback Daunte Culpepper -- mentioned by ESPN's Chris Mortensen as a free agent possibility for Miami -- said he would ''love'' to play again for the Dolphins. ''I live here, and I love [Bill Parcells],'' Culpepper said Tuesday at Alonzo Mourning's charity event. ``And I'm healthy now.''

11:08 AM  
Anonymous PATS_RULE said...

Sick of hearing what the '72 Dolphins have to say! It was 35 years ago; the players were smaller and slower; and the Dolphins had 2, yes 2, teams over 500 on their schedule, while the Pats had 7! Most teams from the current era would physically overmatch the 72 'phish. If you think that a little videotape is the reason why NE has largely destroyed the NFL this year, then you are seriously reaching. Shula and Morris have acted with little class, and even less grace. But then again they are a reflection on the cheesy, miserable, humid, moquito-net, disco armpit that is south Florida! Screw the 72 Dolphins. Hey Mercury, come Sunday the Pats won't just be on your block; they'll have their feet up in your living room and your 35-year-old busted up furniture will be out on the front lawn! Toss-off!

3:13 PM  
Anonymous Bad Karma said...

If the Patriots do go undefeated we can let them in our house, welcome them to the club, and give them a piss warm beer. However if they decide to put their feet up in the living room, we close the shades, lock the friggin doors, turn up the TV, and beat them like a red headed step child. Good luck Giants!

5:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jeff Darlington is a hack.
Signed; Mrs. Darlington

8:16 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Finally! It has been three days since the last article about the 72 Dolphins. I was beginning to go through withdrawls.

10:52 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

uckf het atriotsp!

1:27 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

This blog is dead! Here are the current dolphin rumors. Dolphins looking at Carmichael from the Saints and Jackson from ATL for Offensive Coordinator. Jerry Jones wants to move up to get DMac and Dolphins want the Cowboys #22 and #28 picks PLUS Marion Barber! And OCHO CINCO wants Parcells to call him now cause he wants out of Cincy.

5:33 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Rehash X 10. We know all this already. The whole SB is likely to be a dull blowout. I'll watch but the playoffs as usual were the real action.

Frankly, I'm not interested in your justification for a boondoggle.

I want to know what the status is on Carmichael as OC, more depth on the new coaching hires, how's RB's rehab, Sedrick Ellis' DOMINATION @ the Sr. Bowl, possible trade down rumors...whatever..but not this filler.

10:24 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jerry Jones talks about a trade offer to the Dolphins for the number 1 pick, and you can't even sit down for an hour to write up one of your short pieces. Thumbs up to you, Armando

11:05 PM  
Anonymous 954 BOIYE!!!! said...

We reported along with Dan over at TheLandryHat, that something is in the works between the Miami Dolphins and the Dallas Cowboys regarding the number 1 overall pick. Now, it appears that either ESPNs’ Chris Mortenson has caught wind of something himself, or he finally decided to read our blog. Either way, he too is reporting that something is going on and that RB Marion Barber is a part of it.

1:21 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home